Tag Archives: vascular surgery

SVS Annual Meeting – A Carnival of Expert Surgeons and Professors

This is my 5th day in the stunning San Diego for the 2017 annual meeting of Society of Vascular Surgery. I would just like to say that a less than a week of exposure among these brightest minds of vascular surgery beats months of clinical rotation. You name it: cutting edge research symposium and lectures, technique simulation and practice, exhibition of new technologies for the OR, networking with renouned surgeons and professors (Dr. Frank Veith!), and even mock interviews with program directors. I would highly recommend this event to anyone who is interested in any surgical specialties, or just want to explore the still not-so-well-known field of vascular surgery. They are generous with their scholarships, so apply for them and they just might pay for your trip next time.

Infra-popliteal bypass – longest case by far

Below is a short and sweet version of the longest surgical case thus far in my short and sweet medical career:

Patient is a 47 years old Caucasian male with IDDM, past stroke, past DVT, PVD, and HTN. He has a dry gangrenous ulcer in the plantar aspect of his right first metatarsal, and occlusion of anterior tibial artery. He is scheduled to undergo femoral to peroneal artery bypass with great saphenous vein.

Image result for popliteal to peroneal bypass

Common femoral artery cut down was performed first for pre-op angiogram; this was partially due to the uncertainty of where exactly the occlusion is and patient’s vascular anatomy. We saw completely occlusion of the anterior tibial artery and distal portion of the posterior tibial artery after the takeoff of peroneal artery. The popliteal artery and peroneal artery were patent. Next, the deep compartment of the mid calf was dissected from the medial leg to skeletonize the peroneal artery. We also skeletonized the popliteal artery because we decided convert the procedure to popliteal to peroneal bypass. Afterwards, we proceeded to looko for the GSV in the medial malleolus, but the vein was too small (lower threshold is 3mm in diameter, but ours was much less). Therefore, we retrieved the GSV from up to, following the sephaneous-femoral-junction. Finally, we heparinized, dilated and anastomosed the venous conduit. Due to the difficult, delicate dissection of the deep compartment of the leg, difficulty exposing the GSV, the changing of procedural planning intra-op, and not having the imaging study pre-op made the whole case around 10 hours. Luckily, the goal of re-perfusing the foot as accomplished, with biphasic pulse on doppler post-op.

The take away from this case is for me is the importance of being prepared before diving in. The fascinating part about vascular surgery for me is the options of choosing your strategies for the battle – like a tactician – may it be open, endovascular, medical, or expectant management. The choices branch out further with each category of treatment. However, in this case since we didn’t have a strong plan going in, we were not able to change our plan smoothly on the fly. The result? 10 hours of anesthesia for patient instead of 6. On a good note, there were lots of dissections and anatomy structures that I learned, rather serendipitously I would say though…

Finally, I learned the luxury of having a stool in a marathon case.